How do they become rescues

 Horses come to Shadarobah in a variety of ways:


· Owner surrender: current economic conditions make it difficult for families to support their horse. Family changes such as death, divorce, job loss can have a big impact on the family horse.

· Lack of Education: some owners do not fully recognize the level of care & training that are required with horse ownership. Often times they have chosen a horse which does not really suite their needs.

· Abuse, Neglect, Abandoned. We work with 5 area counties as well as the Indiana State Board of Animal Health. Unlike relatively small animals such as dogs & cats, horses require large pens and specialized care. There are few shelters readily available for horses that have been found or seized.

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intake

 Just getting them loaded on the trailer is a task in itself. Next we are ask them to enter a big barn full of horses & faces they've never seen! First and foremost we focus on making them feel safe and build a relationship of trust.  


The Next Steps: 

  • Assessment performed by Rescue Personnel
  • Determine necessary food regimen
  • Vet Exam
  • Dental Exam
  • Hoof Assessment and Treatment
  • Physical Therapist Evaluation – necessary for more than 80%
  • Chiropractor Visit
  • Personality Assessment
  • Riding test


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While at rescue

 Most of the horses that come to Shadarobah have lost trust in humans and suffer from socialization issues. We focus on integrating them into a pasture group, handling them regularly, helping them to rebuild a sense of confidence and level of trust. Additionally we have a large number of severe neglect & malnourishment cases. We concentrate on getting them healthy and up to appropriate weight levels - which can be a slow gradual process. 


  • Fed at least twice daily – some more!
  • All necessary vet care
  • Routine hoof care
  • Rehabilitation & schooling activities
  • Routine first aid



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cost of care

 Nothing we do could be accomplished without our wonderful donors and supporters. While medical & care professionals provide treatment and services at deeply discounted rates, the cost of care is still high and donations are needed. 


 

Annual Costs:

  • $3,250 Feed
  • $525 Hoof Care ($75 x 7 per year)
  • $175 Dental Care
  • $24 Worming ($8 x 4)
  • $190 Vaccinations ($95 x 2)


  $4,164 = BASIC CARE of ONE horse for ONE year


Not including:

                   Additional Vet Care

                   Therapy 

                   Chiropractic

                   Bedding

                   Barn Expenses ie bedding, electric, water, the list goes on and on... 



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